Pages

Shades of Hate

Storyteller's most complex component is the story simulator. Being the first of its kind with the requirements I have, it is not surprising that I rewrite it every now and then to make it better and more powerful.

For a long time, Storyteller didn't care how character A ended up hating character B; only the fact that "A hates B" mattered. But the past week I enabled the simulator to remember these details. Events can be more detailed now: heartbreak may be about unrequited love, losing a loved one or being skipped over by a crush. But the most affected concept was hate.

Storyteller tells apart anger, dislike and hate. You may be angry at someone you love. You may dislike someone you don't know. But hate in Storyteller is deep, intense, and now pretty colorful:

You steal, capture or fight someone: you are hated.
Jealousy implies hate, villains don't take rejection kindly and Tim ended up hurting somebody Adam loved.

Of course, not all hate is related to villainy:

Hey!

This new feature allows more sophisticated stories and better feedback.

Other updates:
  • I keep rewriting the game in Haxe, making improvements up and down in everything.
  • I managed to make a few of the older levels better and more interesting.
  • I think I made the hardest level so far... It involves parenthood, love, law and revenge!

6 comments:

  1. It's weird, in the last panel I get that Eve is mad at Maria for trying to steal away Adam, but that assumes a lot of rules about what it means to place Maria near Adam. So in one way it's great because I had to think for a bit about why Eve was mad, but in another it's not great because I am not 100% sure of what rules generated that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess it comes from different character traits, Eve and Adam are faithful while Maria is not, so seeing them together might make Eve jealous, despite them not being in love with each other... That is what I get from NL's video...

      Delete
    2. Proximity of characters is important in Storyteller. Not the actual distance, but the relative distance between characters. Characters close to each other "interact" between them, and characters "looking into" a pair of other characters are in most cases just witnesses.

      Thus, Maria and Adam interact directly -> Maria declares, Adam rejects. Eve on the other hand, is not interacting with them but being a witness of the declaration, therefore getting angry...

      Delete